A better title for this post might be No Sleep (so no nightmares)  on Elm Street or Lifestyles of the High and Sugary.

If I lived in a different place, I could make the title similar to a movie about someone who doesn’t sleep well in the northwestern part of America.  The title could be Drowsy in Denver or Insomnia in IllinoisYawning in Yakima. If I lived by my youngest sister, I could name this post Weary near Waxahachie High in Hawaii would be a fun title, but who knows what kind of readers would come by looking for news of a high that does not involve sugar in the blood.

OK.  Enough of that.  Obviously, I’m Goofy in Grapevine from a lack of sleep, as I am cracking myself up with titles that are probably not funny at all if you’re the slightest bit Rested in Richmond.

Yesterday, I woke up to find a huge pitcher of water with straws in it on the kitchen table.  This is a sure sign that J. has been up during the night drinking water because her blood sugar was high.  She didn’t wake me, probably thinking she could drink water, bolus and be fine by morning.  Well, she thought wrong.

When she checked her blood sugar around seven o’clock, it was 578 and she had large ketones. I thought it had to do with the nine peanut butter cookies with Hershey’s Kisses that she ate when she was up in the wee hours of the morning, but now I’m not sure that was the whole reason.  Normally, when she eats and doesn’t bolus, we can bring her blood sugar down to normal range fairly quickly.

Since yesterday morning, some of her blood sugar readings have been:  HI, 494, 436, 511, 389, 305, 283.  She’s checked her blood sugar every 2 hours, we’ve corrected with injections, we’ve increased her basal rate and she’s checked for ketones about 8 times. She’s forced down liters of water and Diet Sprite, but didn’t have an appetite until around ten o’clock  last night.

She vomited and had a fever yesterday afternoon/evening.  This morning she was finally below 300. Through the night when I came in every two hours with the lancing device (is that what the pricker is officially called?) and blood sugar meter, she’d dutifully roll over and prick her finger.  We should probably be glad that we weren’t in Forks sleeping over with the Cullens  with all the pricking she was doing yesterday and through the night. Their self control would likely have been wearing thin by the time this morning rolled around.  What?  They’re fictional characters? Quit raining on my parade and play nice.

During the night, I scooped her blood onto the test strip and gave injections in whichever arm she left out of the blanket for me.  That way she could roll over and get back to sleep more quickly.

We’ve found that she comes down faster (usually) with injections rather than a bolus.  I’m not sure why that is so.  It was not the case these past 24 hours, but seems to finally be working now.  We shall see how the rest of the day pans out.

This is the first fever she’s had since she was diagnosed in December 2006.  I had to get out our manual from the diabetes team at Children’s Hospital to make sure I knew what to do.   Good news.  I did.  🙂

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